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Glossary of Terms

The following definitions are used throughout this Web:

  • Bad Fats: two fats are considered "bad" - trans fats and saturated fats. Most trans fat is created when manufacturers turn liquid oils into more solid fats like shortening and margarine.  Saturated fat occurs naturally in nearly all fatty foods, but mostly in meats, dairy products and tropical oils such as palm oil and coconut.  Saturated fat is also in many of western society's most popular foods, including pizza, hamburgers, tacos, ice cream, lasagna, and cheese.
  • Eating (and drinking): The taking in (swallowing) of food and other nourishing material by the body.
  • Enzyme: a substance that promotes life maintaining and/or life sustaining biochemical reactions in your body.
  • Fortified Foods: is a method used to provide the required nutrients in populations where a certain vitamin or mineral is not available or not available in sufficient quantities.  The required nutrient(s) are added to a staple food, such as flour or salt, or it is added it to drinking water, or to some other food / drink that is consumed.  In this way, the population receives the nutrient(s) that they would otherwise lack.
  • Free Radicals: are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism that may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease.
  • Good Fats: are the naturally occurring, traditional fats that haven't been damaged by high heat, refining, processing or other man-made tampering, such as "partial hydrogenation".  The best of these kinds of fats are found in fish, nuts, avocados, seeds, and even fresh creamery butter.
  • Macronutrient: is a nutrient that is only required in small quantities by the body.  For example, all vitamins and minerals are macronutrients.
  • Malnutrition: A situation that arises when our bodies fail to get all the nutrients that they need to support growth, repair, movement, thinking, and other bodily functions.  If a person suffers from malnutrition they can be more likely to catch diseases and it can affect the functions of their body such as brain, eyesight, height, and weight, the functioning of various organs, as well as the development and formation of body parts, especially in unborn babies, newborn babies, and young children.
  • Metabolism: The amount of energy (calories) your body burns to maintain itself and perform the activities and duties required.  Whether you are eating, drinking, sleeping, working on a computer, cleaning, reading a book, playing, or exercising, your body is constantly burning calories to keep you going and to maintain and sustain your body.
  • Minerals: are inorganic elements that come from the soil and water and are essential for maintaining and sustaining our body.  Various plants and/or animals absorb minerals, and we need to eat these plants and/or animals (or animals that feed on these plants or animals) to obtain these minerals.
  • Nutrients: Food is made up of various different types and concentrations of nutrients that determine how nutritious our food is.  These nutrients include carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water.
  • Nutrition: The taking in and use of food and other nourishing material by the body.  The nutrients contained in this food are extracted, absorbed, and then used as "fuel" for growth, repair, movement, thinking, and for many other bodily functions.  That is, these nutrients are used to maintain and sustain life.
  • Oil Soluble Vitamins: can be are stored in the body’s fatty tissue and in the liver and include vitamin A, D, E, and K.
  • Rickets: a disease caused by a Vitamin D deficiency.  Rickets is a bone disease characterized by a failure to properly mineralize bone tissue, resulting in soft bones and skeletal deformities.
  • Trace Minerals: are minerals that are only required in very small quantities each day.  Examples include chromium, copper, iodine, iron, selenium, and zinc.
  • Vitamins: are essential for maintaining and sustaining our body.  Vitamins are organic substances, that is, they are manufactured plants and/or animals, and we need to eat these plants and/or animals (or animals that feed on these plants or animals) to obtain these vitamins.
  • Water Soluble Vitamins: include vitamin C and all vitamins of type B.  This type of vitamins need to dissolve in water before your body can absorb them, and they must be taken daily because they cannot be stored in the body.  Any water-soluble vitamins that aren't absorbed as they pass through your digestive system are lost from the body (mostly via urine), so you need a fresh supply of these vitamins every day.
 

n Nutrition

n Malnutrition

n Metabolism

n The 5 Food Groups

n Vitamins

n Good Fats Vs Bad Fats

n Carbohydrates

n Dietary Guidelines

n Minerals

n Height and Weight Charts

n Glossary of Terms

n Contact Us

n Home

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